Additional Resources

Through the efforts of the Project Management Institute (PMI) and other leading project management organizations, the project management discipline promotes a well-defined and broadly adopted set of concepts, terminology, methods, and activities. This standard approach is used in a multitude of published frameworks, which are widely available as resources for public sector project managers. Likewise, the State of California has developed standardized oversight programs specifically intended to support California projects and their teams.

The objective of these resources is to assist project managers in understanding how the California Project Management Framework (CA-PMF) intersects with other major frameworks and state oversight processes. The goal is for project managers and teams to benefit from as many project management resources as possible, and for them to save time and effort by leveraging project work among these resources.

Approach

The CA-PMF is intended as a practical guide to help project managers and teams successfully manage information technology (IT) projects. These resources and tools help tie the CA-PMF to the “larger universe” of project management knowledge, frameworks, and oversight.

Each panel provides detail and information pertaining to the following three components:

  • CA-PMF Quick Reference
  • Framework Resources
  • Framework References

CA-PMF Quick Reference

This CA-PMF Quick Reference section features graphics related to the key navigation elements from each process phase of the CA-PMF. It presents this information from two perspectives, including the perspective of a particular key element across all process phases of the Project Management Lifecycle, as well as the perspective of a single process phase.

Key Elements By Process Phase

Each process phase of the CA-PMF contains a navigation graphic referencing six categories of information to help the project manager navigate that process phase. These include recommended practices to consider, a list of key roles active during that process phase, processes for the project team to follow, activities the project team should undertake, tools available within the CA-PMF to assist project teams during the process phase, and outputs for the project team to generate during that process phase. Here, the elements by process phase are displayed in a consolidated view of each of the following concepts. This includes those from each of the process phase chapters.


Recommended Practices by Process Phase

The CA-PMF includes narratives describing the recommended practices that are advised for each phase, based on lessons learned and best practice. The figure below shows each phase’s key recommended practices.

Project Management Recommended Practices

Concept
  • Validate the Concept for a Strong Foundation
  • Have a Strong Business Case
  • Is Your Organization Ready for Change?
  • Don't Underestimate and Oversimplify User Research and Engagement
Initiating
  • It is Never Too Early to Engage Users
  • Effective Sponsorship is the Key to Success
  • The Business Need Drives the Project
  • Check in with Your Organization's Enterprise Architect or Opportunities May be Missed
  • Engage Stakeholders Strategically
  • Tackle the Project in Bite-Size Pieces and Deliver Incrementally to Reduce Risk
  • Change is Hard, So Start Planning for Your Change Early
Planning
  • It Takes a Village... to Make a Project Successful
  • Connect the Dots... Clarify the Scope
  • Make a Deliberate Choice When Determining the Delivery Method
  • When No Matter the Size or Scope, the Schedule is a Key Component
  • Who Wants to talk about Security?
  • Effective Change Management Requires Close Attention to an Organization's Culture
  • Plan to Continually Discover and Validate User Needs
  • Early Governance Helps Set Stakeholder Expectations
  • Clear Performance Metrics Benefit Both Contractors and Project Managers
Executing
  • Communicate, Communicate, Communicate
  • Don't Ignore the Users
  • Capturing Action Items From Team Meetings
  • Early and Effective Testing Can Prevent Major Project Cost Issues Down the Road
  • Problems Don't Go Away - They Only Get Bigger Over Time
  • Engage the Maintenance and Operations (M&O) Team Sooner
  • Leadership Is the Project Manager's Job
  • Have Clearly Defined Go/No Go Checkpoints
  • Be Honest About Project Progress to Continually Improve
  • Think Globally and Act Strategically
  • Testing and Training Activities are NOT Schedule and Cost Buffers
  • Warning Signs: Be on the Lookout
  • Don't Skimp on Quality
  • Don’t be Afraid to Pull the Plug
  • Speak Up to Achieve a Project Win
Closing
  • Recognition is a Must
  • Lessons Learned is Not Optional
  • Don't forget the PIER


Roles by Process Phase

The Framework includes narratives describing the responsibilities for project stakeholders involved in the project, including a list of key roles. The figure below shows each key roles within each process phase.

Project Management Roles

Concept
  • Executive Sponsor(s)
  • Project Sponsor
  • IT Sponsor
  • Business Owner(s)
  • Stakeholders
Initiating
  • Executive Sponsor(s)
  • Project Sponsor
  • Stakeholders
  • IT Sponsor
  • Business Owner(s)
  • Project Manager
  • Department of Technology (CDT)
Planning
  • Executive Sponsor(s)
  • Project Sponsor
  • IT Sponsor
  • Business Owner(s)
  • Project Manager
  • Project Team
  • Contract Manager
  • Information Security Officer (ISO)
  • Subject Matter Experts
  • Department of Technology (CDT)
  • Department of Finance (DOF)
Executing
  • Executive Sponsor(s)
  • Project Sponsor
  • IT Sponsor
  • Business Owner(s)
  • Project Manager
  • Stakeholders
  • Department of Technology (CDT)
  • Department of Finance (DOF)
  • Project Support Staff
  • Solutions Vendor
Closing
  • Executive Sponsor(s)
  • Project Sponsor
  • IT Sponsor
  • IT Product Owner(s)
  • Project Manager
  • Transition to Support Lead
  • Project Support Staff


Processes by Process Phase

The Framework includes narratives describing the steps or procedures that the project team should follow. The figure below shows each phase’s key processes.

Project Management Processes

Concept
  • Identify the Project Sponsor(s) and Stakeholders
  • Conduct a Readiness Assessment
  • Project Approval Process
  • Concept Process Phase Review
Initiating
  • Establish Project Staffing
  • Create a Project Library
  • Review Current Documentation
  • Conduct Stakeholder Analysis
  • Preform Charter Analysis
  • Monitoring & Controlling
  • Project Approval Process
  • Initiating Process Phase Review
Planning
  • Prepare for Planning Process Phase Activities
  • Develop Planning Process Phase Artifacts
  • Approve and Baseline Planning Process Phase Artifacts
  • Optimize Planning Process Phase Artifacts
  • Project Approval Process
  • Conduct Procurements
  • Planning Process Phase Review
Executing
  • Assemble the Resources
  • Prepare for the Executing of the Process Phase Activities
  • Direct and Manage Project Work
  • Monitoring and Controlling Project Work
  • Develop Project Status Reports
  • Executing Process Phase Review
Closing
  • Prepare for Project Closure
  • Closeout Project Artifacts
  • Conduct Lessons Learned
  • Celebrate Success
  • Administrative Closeout
  • Closing Process Phase Review


Activities by Process Phase

The Framework includes narratives describing what should be done during each project process phase, including the specific activities to undertake and when to undertake them. The figure below shows these key activities.

Project Management Activities

Concept
  • Identify the Specific Business Problem or Opportunity
  • Establish a Clear Business Case
  • Assess the Organizational Impact
  • Complete the Concept Development and Readiness Assessment
  • Conduct a High-Level Risk Assessment
  • Begin Drafting the S1BA (PAL)
  • Complete the Concept Process Phase Checklist
Initiating
  • Identify Project Sponsorship
  • Identify a Project Manager
  • Form the Project Planning Team
  • Create Project Document Repository and Review Current Documentation
  • Identify Stakeholder Project Priorities
  • Create a RACI Matrix
  • Develop the Scope Statement
  • Develop the Budget Estimate
  • Develop the Schedule Estimate
  • Document Assumptions, Constraints, and Risks
  • Develop the Project Charter
  • Monitor & Control the Project
  • Complete the S1BA (PAL)
  • Complete the Initiating Process Phase Checklist
Planning
  • Complete the Complexity Assessment
  • Update the RACI Matrix
  • Hold Planning Process Phase Kickoff Meeting
  • Set Project Practices
  • Develop the Project Management Plan (PMP)
  • Develop Subordinate Project Plans
  • Develop the Work Plan
  • Baseline Project Plans
  • Optimize Project Artifacts
  • Complete the Planning Process Phase Checklist
Executing
  • Acquire the Project Team and Commit Resources
  • Conduct Contractor On-Boarding
  • Hold Executing Process Phase Kick-Off
  • Transition the Project Manager Responsibilities
  • Execute the Project Management Plan
  • Integrate Project and Contractor Plans
  • Review and Update the RACI Matrix
  • Confirm Scope and Requirements
  • Lead and Manage the Project Team
  • Manage the Contractor Team
  • Manage Stakeholder Expectations
  • Carry Out Project Communications
  • Monitoring & Controlling Project Activities
  • Complete the Executing Process Phase Checklist
Closing
  • Verify Acceptance of All Project Deliverables
  • Resolve or Transfer Ownership of Open Issues
  • Complete Final Project Status Report
  • Archive Final Project Records
  • Conduct Lessons Learned
  • Celebrate Success
  • Conduct Contract Closeout
  • Complete Project Financials
  • Release Staff
  • Release Facilities and Resources
  • Complete Post Implementation Evaluation Report (PIER)
  • Complete the Closing Process Phase Checklist


Tools by Process Phase

The CA-PMF provides a number of resources and tools that project teams can use to help complete the activities included within each process phase of the project. An important part of the Framework is the inclusion of tools in an easy-to-use format. The tool set is intentionally intuitive, and most tools are configurable so that project teams can adjust them as needed to help manage the project accordingly. The figure below identifies the resources and tools available to help with each of the process phases.

Project Management Tools

Concept
  • Concept Development and Readiness Assessment Template
  • Stage 1 Business Analysis Template (PAL)
  • Concept Process Phase Checklist Template
Initiating
  • Project Priorities Assessment Template
  • RACI Matrix Template
  • Stakeholder Register Template
  • Project Charter Template
  • Status Reports (Oversight)
  • Stage 1 Business Analysis Template (PAL)
  • Project Document Library Repository
  • Project Document Approval Template
  • Initiating Process Phase Checklist Template
Planning
  • Complexity Assessment Template
  • Project Management Plan (PMP) Template and Subordinate Project Document Templates
  • Project Status Reports (Oversight)
  • Stage 2 Alternatives Analysis Template (PAL)
  • Stage 3 Solution Development Template (PAL)
  • Stage 4 Project Readiness and Approval Template (PAL)
  • Planning Process Phase Checklist Template
Executing
  • Project Status Reports (Oversight)
  • Deliverable Expectation Document (DED) Template
  • Work Authorization Template
  • Process Improvement Plan Template
  • Operational Readiness Assessment (ORA) Template
  • Formal Product Acceptance Template
  • Sponsorship Commitment Survey Template
  • Team Effectiveness Survey Template
  • Executing Process Phase Checklist Template
Closing
  • Issue Log Template
  • Project Status Reports (Oversight)
  • Lessons Learned Template
  • Post Implementation Evaluation Report (PIER) (Oversight)
  • Closing Process Phase Checklist Template


Outputs by Process Phase

Creation of project artifacts is an important part of each process phase’s activities. These help define the management activities through which the project’s progress is tracked, controlled, and adjusted based on actual progress. These artifacts include outputs developed by the project team and form the collection of documentation, plans, and procedures that will be used to manage the project.

Each process phase narrative describes the project outputs that are generally prepared within each phase. These project outputs often serve as inputs to a process in the next process phase of the project. The figure below identifies the main outputs prepared in each of the process phases.

Project Management Outputs

Concept
  • Completed Concept Development and Readiness Assessment
  • Completed High-Level Risk Assessment
  • Draft Stage 1 Business Analysis
  • Completed Concept Process Phase Checklist
Initiating
  • Completed Project Priorities Assessment
  • Completed RACI Matrix
  • Completed Stakeholder Register
  • Completed Project Charter
  • Completed Stage 1 Business Analysis (PAL)
  • Established Project Document Library
  • Completed Initiating Process Phase Checklist
Planning
  • Completed Complexity Assessment
  • Completed Project Management Plan (PMP) and Subordinate Project Documents
  • Completed Development of Project Policies
  • Updated RACI Matrix
  • Initial Risk Register
  • Optimized Project Plans
  • Completed Project Approval Lifecycle (PAL) Documents)
  • Completed Planning Process Phase Checklist
Executing
  • Completed System Development Lifecycle (SDLC) Documents
  • Completed Status Reports (Oversight)
  • Completed Deliverable Expectation Document (DED)
  • Completed Work Authorizations
  • Completed Process Improvement Plan
  • Completed Operational Readiness Assessment (ORA)
  • Completed Formal Product Acceptance
  • Completed Sponsorship Commitment Survey
  • Completed Team Effectiveness Survey
  • Completed Executing Process Phase Checklist
Closing
  • Completed Issue Log
  • Completed Risk Register
  • Completed Change Request Log
  • Completed Lessons Learned Documentation
  • Completed Final Status Report(s) (Oversight)
  • Completed Post Implementation Evaluation Report (PIER) (Oversight)
  • Completed Closing Process Phase Checklist

Framework Resources

How does the CA-PMF relate to State of California project oversight programs and other project frameworks?
The Framework Resources section describes how the process phases and tools of the CA-PMF interrelate with the Project Approval Lifecycle (PAL), California Department of Technology (CDT) Project Approvals and Oversight (PAO), and the System Development Life Cycle (SDLC). Multiple illustrations and tables are included to provide and help promote an understanding and provide quick points of reference. For more information, visit the Framework Resources section of the PDF.

These four components are discussed below:

  • CA-PMF Relationships
  • Comparing the CA-PMF with the PAL
  • Comparing the CA-PMF with PAO
  • Comparing the CA-PMF with the SDLC

CA-PMF Relationships

This section details the relationship between the CA-PMF and associated State of California project-related processes. For more information, consult the CA-PMF Maps section of the PDF.

The benefits from this mapping exercise include:

  • Clarification of how the California Project Management Framework (CA-PMF) process phases, processes, and tools interrelate with the Project Approval Lifecycle (PAL), California Department of Technology Oversight, and the System Development Life Cycle (SDLC).
  • Definitions of project management roles and focus areas necessary to ensure the CA-PMF complements processes described in PAL, Oversight, and SDLC.
  • Recommendations as to where information from one set of processes may be leveraged to support other processes.

The California Department of Technology’s Project Approvals and Oversight (PAO) governs both PAL and the Oversight Framework.

  • Project Approval Lifecycle (PAL) - The California Department of Technology (CDT) adopted PAL to improve quality, value, and probability of success for state information technology projects. PAL consists of four stages separated by gates. This section will be updated periodically as the department continues to develop and refine the PAL program. See the CDT website at: https://cdt.ca.gov for more information.
  • Oversight Framework - Once a project is approved, the project team is responsible for reporting project progress in compliance with the State Administrative Manual (SAM) Section 4819.36 and the Statewide Information Management Manual (SIMM) Section 45. The IT Project Oversight Division (ITPOD) provides project oversight and advice to state organizations and project teams. ITPOD’s oversight guidelines are detailed in its Oversight Framework. See the Department of Technology website for more details regarding ITPOD services.

The section covering the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) provides key linkages between the SDLC and the CA-PMF. For the purposes of these mappings, the SDLC is defined as the process for conceiving, defining, designing, creating, testing, deploying, and maintaining an information system.

Comparing the CA-PMF with the Project Approval Lifecycle (PAL)

This section details the relationship between the CA-PMF and PAL. Information is presented in tables to show the relationship and how the CA-PMF  tools and processes relate elements of the four Project Approval Lifecycle (PAL) stages. For more information, consult the Comparing the CA-PMF with PAL section of the PDF.

Comparing the CA-PMF with Project Approvals and Oversight (PAO)

This section will help to identify how each project oversight activity established in the Statewide Information Management Manual (SIMM 05A) relates to the CA-PMF processes and tools.
Effective project management structures should provide data and information required to prepare reports required by the Office of Statewide Project Delivery (OSPD).
The CA-PMF will guide the project team in navigating project oversight activities in conjunction with the CA-PMF processes. The following four areas are covered:

  • Special Project Report (SPR), including the Budget Change Proposal (BCP)
  • Independent Project Oversight Report (IPOR)
  • Project Status Report (PSR)
  • Post Implementation Evaluation Report (PIER)

For more information, refer to the Comparing the CA-PMF with the Project Approvals and Oversight (PAO) section of the PDF.

Comparing the CA-PMF with the System Development Lifecycle (SDLC)

This section maps the CA-PMF to the SDLC phases. The goal is to illustrate the following:

  • How various project management process phases coincide with SDLC phases
  • How project management tools link with SDLC tools
  • How project objectives map or trace through SDLC phases

The Project Management Institute’s (PMI) Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK) is the accepted “standard” for project management. PMI developed the PMBOK Guide, now in its 5th Edition, as the standard guide for project management practices. A PMBOK mapping is also provided to add a standard-based project management reference for Project Managers and project teams, allowing comparison between PMBOK, CA-PMF, and SDLC Phases. For more information, please visit the Comparing the CA-PMF with the SDLC section of the PDF.

Framework References

Through the efforts of the Project Management Institute (PMI) and others, project management incorporates a well-defined and broadly adopted set of concepts, terminology, and activities. This standard approach can be seen in published frameworks, developed locally or in other states, which are widely available as resources for public sector project managers in California. For more information, see the Framework References section of the PDF.

These four components are discussed below:

  • Project Management Institute (PMI)
  • Other California Frameworks
  • Other State, Federal, and University Frameworks
  • Glossary including Project Role Definitions and Project Management Terms

Project Management Institute (PMI)

The PMI is an international, non-profit professional organization dedicated to advancing the state of the art in the management of projects. The PMI is the largest organization, nationally and internationally, providing the ethical and professional standards applicable to practitioners of project management.

To view the PMBOK Project Management Process Groups/ Knowledge Areas map to the CA-PMF Processes.

The PMI produces many publications and resources, in addition to the PMBOK Guide, that can be of great value to California project managers and teams of all levels of experience. The following publications were used as references for the CA-PMF and are available through the PMI at: http://www.pmi.org/PMBOK-Guide-and-Standards.aspx

Other California Frameworks

The California Office of Systems Integration (OSI) has long been a leader in this field. Their publications and tools were used as a reference for the Framework and are available through their website at: http://www.bestpractices.ca.gov/sysacq/projectlifecycle.shtml

Other State, Federal, and University Frameworks

The CA-PMF also reviewed frameworks developed by other states, the federal government, as well as public and private universities.

  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
  • Maryland
  • Michigan
  • New York
  • Texas
  • Washington State
  • University of Wisconsin
  • Northwestern University

Glossary

The glossary in the CA-PMF offers a list of major project management-related roles, terms and acronyms, many of which are used or referenced in the Framework. Understanding project roles and terms is vital to project success. The sections provide brief descriptions of many project-related and IT-related role definitions and terms. Depending on the size of the organization and the project, a single person may hold more than one role. While these lists do not cover all roles and terms, the focus is to identify the most important and widely used. For more information, please consult the Glossary section of the PDF.

Project Role Definitions

Contains a high-level list and description of many of the roles, people, groups, and organizations involved in the various elements of a project. Visit the Project Role Definitions section of the PDF for more information.

Project Management Terms

Contains a high-level list of Project Management terms that are widely among projects of all sizes and complexities. Consult the Project Management Terms section of the PDF for more information.